Can You Name Multiple Persons As Joint Powers of Attorney in New Jersey?

By Fredrick P. Niemann, Esq. of Hanlon Niemann & Wright, a Freehold, NJ Power of Attorney and Healthcare Directive Attorney

Sometimes clients ask me to name joint persons as powers of attorney. While I discourage such an option I understand why some people still want it. So, here is the law on the subject. I have just listed the applicable statutes without commenting. I’ll do that in a future post.

N.J.S.A. 46:2B-8.7. Multiple attorneys-in-fact, reads

  1.  Unless the power of attorney expressly provides otherwise, all authority granted to multiple attorneys-in-fact may be exercised by the one or more who remain after the death, resignation or disability of one or more of the attorneys-in-fact.
  2.  The power of attorney may provide that the attorneys-in-fact may act severally or separately. If so provided, any one of the appointed attorneys-in-fact may exercise all powers granted.
  3.  The power of attorney may provide that the attorneys-in-fact shall act jointly. If so provided then, subject to subsection a., the concurrence of all appointed attorneys-in-fact is required to exercise any power.
  4.  If the power of attorney does not expressly provide whether the attorneys-in-fact are to act severally or separately, or are to act jointly, such attorneys-in-fact must act jointly.
  5.  The power of attorney may provide that the attorneys-in-fact act successively. Unless the power of attorney otherwise provides for the conditions under which a successor is qualified to act, the successor may act only upon the death, the written resignation, or the disability of the predecessor named attorney-in-fact.

To discuss your NJ Power of Attorney and Healthcare Directive matter, please contact Fredrick P. Niemann, Esq. toll-free at (855) 376-5291 or email him at fniemann@hnlawfirm.com.  Please ask us about our video conferencing consultations if you are unable to come to our office.